THE IMPORTANCE OF A QUALITY DOG BED

The importance of a quality dog bed

It may come as a bit of a surprise but we humans are really not that different from our canine companions when it comes to choosing somewhere to have a restful and rejuvenating sleep.

Physically, we both have a skeletal structure which benefits from correct alignment during sleep and we both have vulnerable exposed joints that can deteriorate over time. Psychologically too, we need a safe, secure, peaceful place of refuge away from the hurly-burly of everyday life that’s warm and inviting.

Our bed is a long-term investment in your general comfort and well being. The same should certainly apply to your dog as he/she is likely to use if far more than our standard 8 hours with 13 hours + being the norm.

When it comes to choosing either a human or canine bed there is much truth in the adage that a Quality Structure and Fillings = Quality Sleep

Regrettably, the majority of store-bought dog beds are made to a price point rather than a quality standard. Yes, they often look good but the interior filling is usually lose blown fibre that quickly clumps, becomes shapeless and provides virtually zero support from the outset.

Also, how on earth do you keep the bed clean? Unless the dog bed has a removable cover or you have a toy breed, machine washing is a virtual impossibility.

On the subject of covers, choosing a bed with replaceable covers means a far more cost-effective long-term solution than replacing the whole bed. At Berkeley, we use a tough waterproof fabric to protect the inner core and we offer a variety of upholstery grade fabric covers and toppers for additional warmth and comfort.

It’s also worth mentioning about temperature regulation when it comes to choosing a quality dog bed. At the risk of stating the obvious, dogs are covered in fur so keeping warm is rarely a problem. Yes, the bed needs thick insulation to protect your dog from cold floors and it needs to be sited away from cold drafts but your dog is far more likely to suffer from overheating than being too cold.

This means that a dog bed needs to be breathable – warm in winter/cool in summer or when the central heating is on.

Memory foam has some key benefits it is temperature-sensitive meaning that it can feel hard initially and then quickly become too hot. Also, like many foam-based fillings, they are often treated with fire retardant chemicals which are widely believed to be toxic to both pets and humans.

Finally, we can’t say it too often – invest in QUALITY. A dog bed should be heavy, thick and quite firm. Moreover, it should be traceable – Who made it? Where was it made? What’s in it? Does it have a guarantee? Who do I contact for advice?

You can read more about what makes our dog beds so special by clicking here

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